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An introduction to Life-Course Criminology

By: Christoffer Carlsson Jerzy Sarnecki.
Material type: TextTextISBN: 9781446275917.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Most people engage in crime at some point in their lives, but why does almost everybody stop soon after? And, why do a small number of offenders persist in crime? These two questions constitute the core of the field often known as life-course criminology. </p> This book provides a comprehensive introduction to life-course criminology. It covers the dominant theories and methodologies in the field and equips you with all you need to succeed in your studies on the subject. The book: </p> Discusses the methodologies of life-course and longitudinal research Explains and critiques the major theories of life-course criminology Considers the issues of risk, prediction, onset, persistence and desistance of criminal activity Draws on research from studies in Europe, the UK, US and Australia, including the Stockholm Life-Course Project <p> Written by two leading figures in the field, this is an authoritative text that will guide you through your studies in life-course criminology, criminal career research, and developmental criminology. </p>

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Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • List of Tables and Figures (p. viii)
  • About the Authors (p. x)
  • Acknowledgements (p. xi)
  • 1 Life-Course Criminology: An Introduction (p. 1)
  • Crime and the Life Course as a Field of Study (p. 1)
  • An Imagination for Studying the Life Course (p. 3)
  • 1 The Historical Nature of Time and Place (p. 5)
  • 2 The Timing of Human Lives (p. 7)
  • 3 The Linking of Human Lives (p. 8)
  • 4 Human Agency (p. 8)
  • A Brief History of Life-Course Criminology (p. 9)
  • Key Dimensions and Concepts (p. 11)
  • Life-Course Studies in Europe and Scandinavia (p. 12)
  • 'The Big Debate' (p. 15)
  • The Structure of this Book (p. 18)
  • Suggestions for Further Reading (p. 19)
  • 2 Criminological Theories and Criminal Careers (p. 21)
  • Criminological Theories and Criminal Careers (p. 21)
  • The Chicago School (p. 22)
  • Matza and the Question of Maturational Reform (p. 24)
  • Labeling and Sequential Models of Deviance (p. 25)
  • On the Criminological Margin (p. 27)
  • Suggestions for Further Reading (p. 28)
  • 3 Life-Course Theories of Crime and Deviance (p. 29)
  • Static Theories of Criminal Careers (p. 30)
  • A General Theory of Crime: The Importance of Self-Control (p. 31)
  • Moffitt's Dual Developmental Taxonomy (p. 35)
  • Dynamic Theories of Criminal Careers (p. 41)
  • Sampson, Laub and Social Control, Revisited (p. 42)
  • Farrington's ICAP Theory (p. 47)
  • Some Final Remarks (p. 49)
  • Suggestions for Further Reading (p. 51)
  • 4 The Methodologies of Life-Course Criminology (p. 52)
  • Why Study The Life Course? (p. 53)
  • Life-Course Research and the Longitudinal Method (p. 54)
  • Prospective and Retrospective Designs (p. 54)
  • Quantitative and Qualitative Methods (p. 56)
  • Two Forms of Quantitative Data (p. 57)
  • Qualitative Data: Process, Life History, and Context (p. 59)
  • Mixing Methods (p. 60)
  • Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Research: The Main Differences (p. 62)
  • The Persons (p. 63)
  • The Variables (p. 64)
  • The Time (p. 65)
  • The Stockholm Life Course Project: A Case Study (p. 67)
  • The 1956 Clientele Study of Juvenile Delinquents (p. 67)
  • The §12 Youth Group (p. 72)
  • Retrospective or Prospective? (p. 73)
  • What Do You Want to Know? (p. 74)
  • Suggestions for Further Reading (p. 74)
  • 5 Risk and Prediction of Criminal Careers (p. 76)
  • Defining Risk Factors (p. 76)
  • Risk Factors and Criminal Careers (p. 78)
  • Specific Risk Factors (p. 79)
  • Gender and Risk Factors (p. 83)
  • Risk Factors and Prediction (p. 85)
  • Using Risk Factors to Predict Criminal Careers (p. 86)
  • A Case Study: Testing Risk Factors' Predictive Value (p. 88)
  • Final Remarks (p. 94)
  • Suggestions for Further Reading (p. 95)
  • 6 Onset of Crime (p. 96)
  • Defining Onset (p. 96)
  • Measuring Onset (p. 98)
  • Research on Onset (p. 100)
  • Early Onset (p. 100)
  • A Brief Note on Adolescent Onset (p. 102)
  • Late, or Adult Onset (p. 103)
  • 'Strategic Crimes' (p. 104)
  • Understanding Onset (p. 105)
  • Suggestions for Further Reading (p. 106)
  • 7 Continuity in Offending: Persistence (p. 107)
  • Understanding Persistence (p. 108)
  • Persistence as Phenomenon and Concept (p. 108)
  • Explanations of Persistence (p. 110)
  • Population Heterogeneity and Persistence (p. 110)
  • State Dependence and Persistence (p. 112)
  • Distinguishing Explanations of Persistence (p. 115)
  • Drugs and Persistence (p. 116)
  • Gender and Persistence (p. 117)
  • The Importance of Intermittency (p. 119)
  • The Implications of Persistence (p. 122)
  • Suggestions for Further Reading (p. 123)
  • 8 Desistance From Crime (p. 124)
  • Defining Desistance (p. 124)
  • Desistance: The Basics (p. 126)
  • A Note on False Desistance (p. 127)
  • Explaining Desistance (p. 127)
  • Desistance and Human Agency (p. 133)
  • The Dynamics of Agency and Identity: Pro-Social Blueprints (p. 134)
  • Gender and Desistance (p. 136)
  • The Implications of Desistance (p. 138)
  • Interventions and Desistance (p. 141)
  • Suggestions for Further Reading (p. 142)
  • 9 Looking Back, Looking Forward (p. 143)
  • The Futures of Life-Course Criminology (p. 143)
  • The Need for New Life-Course Studies of Crime (p. 144)
  • The Study of Criminal Transmissions (p. 144)
  • The Expansion of Qualitative Studies of Crime and the Life Course (p. 144)
  • Forms of Crime, Types of Offenders (p. 145)
  • Life-Course Criminology Beyond Crime? (p. 145)
  • Intervening in the Life Course (p. 146)
  • Crime, Criminology and the Life Course (p. 147)
  • References (p. 149)
  • Index (p. 166)