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Green economics: an introduction to theory, policy and practice

By: Molly Scott Cato.
Material type: TextTextISBN: 9781844075706.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The world as we know it needs a new economics. Climate change, financial crisis and out-of-control globalization - all the major problems facing the world have their root in the dominant economic system. The globalised marketplace is the prevailing force in our lives, undermining the real importance of our human communities and our planet. Green Economics argues that society should be embedded within the ecosystem, and that markets and economies are social structures that should respond to social and environmental priorities.This highly readable text provides an introduction to green economics including views on taxation, welfare, money, economic development and employment through the work of its inspirational figures including Schumacher, Robertson and Douthwaite. It also explores the contributions and insights of schools of thought critical of the dominant neo-classical economic paradigm, including ecofeminism, views from the global South, and the perspective of indigenous peoples. Examples of effective green policies that are already being implemented across the world are presented, as well as policy prescriptions for issues including climate change, localization, citizens' income, economic measurement, ecotaxes and trade.

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Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • List of Photographs, Figures, Tables and Boxes (p. ix)
  • Acknowledgements (p. xiii)
  • Preface (p. xv)
  • 1 Green Economics: Economics for People and the Planet (p. 1)
  • Why green economics? (p. 2)
  • What is green economics? (p. 5)
  • From economic growth to a balanced economy (p. 9)
  • Why green economics now? (p. 11)
  • Where do we go from here? (p. 13)
  • Part I Theory
  • 2 Where Did It All Start? (p. 17)
  • Intellectual roots: Greeks, socialists and anarchists (p. 18)
  • Spiritual dimensions (p. 19)
  • Key figures and ideas (p. 21)
  • Challenging economics in the academy (p. 30)
  • 3 Economics and Identity (p. 35)
  • Sustainability values, not monetary value (p. 35)
  • The guiding vision: Balance, not growth (p. 38)
  • Economics and relationship (p. 41)
  • Re-embedding economics in nature (p. 45)
  • Not squaring the circle but closing the loop (p. 47)
  • Part II Vision for the Future
  • 4 Work (p. 55)
  • Will a green economy mean more work or less? (p. 56)
  • Whose work is it anyway? (p. 59)
  • Deskilling and reskilling (p. 61)
  • Greening production and distribution (p. 64)
  • 5 Money (p. 71)
  • The politics of money (p. 72)
  • Money and global injustice (p. 74)
  • Money creation: Financially and ecologically unstable (p. 77)
  • How money wastes people (p. 79)
  • Local currencies for a localized world (p. 81)
  • Conclusion (p. 85)
  • 6 Green Business: From Maximizing Profits to a Vision of Conviviality (p. 89)
  • Limitations of market and technological solutions (p. 90)
  • Issues of scale and ownership (p. 92)
  • Learning to switch the lights off (p. 95)
  • Low-carbon growth as the flourishing of the convivial economy (p. 98)
  • Part III Policies for a Green Economy
  • 7 The Policy Context (p. 105)
  • The ecological modernization discourse (p. 106)
  • Policy responses to climate change (p. 109)
  • What's wrong with GDP? (p. 113)
  • Measuring what we value (p. 116)
  • 8 Globalization and Trade (p. 123)
  • Whose comparative advantage? (p. 124)
  • How free is free trade? (p. 126)
  • Trade in the era of climate change and peak oil (p. 129)
  • Greening trade locally (p. 131)
  • Greening trade globally (p. 134)
  • 9 Relocalizing Economic Relationships (p. 139)
  • Localization to replace globalization (p. 139)
  • Political protection for local economies (p. 142)
  • Self-reliant local economies on the ground (p. 144)
  • The next step: The bioregional economy (p. 150)
  • Conclusion (p. 153)
  • 10 Green Taxation (p. 157)
  • Theory of green taxation (p. 157)
  • Strategic taxation (p. 160)
  • Taxes on commons (p. 162)
  • Ecotaxes (p. 164)
  • 11 Green Welfare (p. 171)
  • Green approaches to social policy (p. 171)
  • What is poverty? What is welfare? (p. 173)
  • Sharing the wealth; sharing the poverty (p. 176)
  • What is the welfare state? (p. 179)
  • Citizens' Income and people's pensions (p. 181)
  • A health service, not an illness service (p. 183)
  • 12 Land and the Built Environment (p. 187)
  • Land and economics (p. 187)
  • Taxing land (p. 190)
  • Building on land (p. 193)
  • Growing on the land (p. 197)
  • 13 Summary and Further Resources (p. 205)
  • Index (p. 219)